Welcome to BlogNotions' Energy Blog

The BlogNotions Energy Blog delivers a diverse series of perspectives provided by thought leaders in a variety of energy niches. Presented by NetLine, this forum delivers compelling updates on the latest advancements in the energy and power industry, discussions of renewable energy strategies, new ideas for advancing green efforts, implications of public policy on power production, and much more. Here you can find helpful information, ask questions, and collaborate freely.

Graphene Quantum Dots Better Than Platinum in Fuel Cells

Posted on October 1st, 2014 by Hydro Kevin Researchers at Rice University have discovered that graphene quantum dots (GQDs) serve as better catalysts in fuel cells than does platinum. And the quantum nanodots are made from (cover your eyes fossil fuel rejectionists) coal. According to , “The Rice lab of chemist James Tour created dots […]

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Forty Alstom hydrail trainsets for Germany !

by guest blogger Stan Thompson Since you’re reading this, you already know how indebted the hydrogen community is to Kevin—the originator of this blog—for his role in keeping us up to date with the biggest news about the littlest atom. Today, though, I’m more grateful than ever; Kevin just tipped me off about an article in […]

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Glasgow Half Full in Hydrogen Production

Posted on September 25th, 2014 by Hydro Kevin Researchers at the University of Glasgow in Scotland (still part of the UK after the vote) have discovered a way to produce hydrogen 30 times faster than current renewable methods. This method allows hydrogen to be produced using less electricity, at atmospheric pressure and do so using […]

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“External Assurance” in Sustainability Reporting on the Rise

Sustainability reporting should be comprehensive, transparent, non-biased and standardized, and the best way to improve the quality and credibility of reporting, according to the , is through third-party involvement, or “external assurance,” of sustainability reports. GRI pioneered the use of a comprehensive “Sustainability Reporting Framework,” comprising reporting guidelines and sector disclosures, to help enable organizations […]

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Water and Energy:

                       A Close Connection Several recent items brought home for me the very close linkage between water and energy.  In particular, one study suggests that coal and nuclear .  The study predicts that rising temperatures could exacerbate the problems we have seen in recent years with plants having to shut down because cooling water temperatures […]

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Two New Toyota Fuel Cell Vehicles Spied in California

Posted on September 18th, 2014 by Hydro Kevin Two new Toyota Fuel Cell Vehicles have been spied in different parts of California this week. The first report was by Mike Magrath, a Features Editor at Edmunds.com. Mr. Magrath tweeted two spy shots he took of the in Southern California as he was needing help in […]

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United Hydrail Nations

by guest blogger Stan Thompson This update follows much farther behind the wonderfully successful 9th International Hydrail Conference in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (June 2014) than I had intended.  The reason is one I can’t regret: the cast of international players on the hydrail stage has grown so large, and there are so many  intertwining plots, that I can hardly keep up […]

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Gold Nanoparticles Help Produce 74 Times More Hydrogen

Posted on September 16th, 2014 by Hydro Kevin Researchers in South Korea have succeeded in producing 74 times more hydrogen from water using sunlight and gold nanoparticles. Business Korea , “According to the research team, gold nanoparticles are capable of producing hydrogen from water by absorbing visible rays at a low energy level and creating […]

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Are we on the path of ‘Limits to Growth’?

Probably the most important thing you need to know about the 1972 book entitled is that it makes no predictions. Rather, the much maligned study provides scenarios for thinking about the future of resource use, pollution, population, food, and industrial production. Limits to Growth detailed three scenarios originally, one of them called business-as-usual or BAU. […]

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