Archive | October, 2013

Radical SAM Enzyme Produces Hydrogen

Scientists at University of California, Davis, have been researching how bacteria produce hydrogen. One of the ways is by combining radical SAM enzymes with iron and sulfur atoms. According to Futurity, “The bacterial catalysts are based on precisely organized clusters of iron and sulfur atoms, with side groups of cyanide and carbon monoxide. Those molecules […]

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The Numbers Don’t Add Up to U.S. Energy Independence

Energy independence sounds good, and that’s why politicians and oil company executives love to say the words. It’s so easy to say, but oh so hard to actually accomplish, which is why the United States has been a consistent importer of oil since the late 1940s. Recent overblown statements about U.S. energy independence from the […]

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SolarCity in Focus

SolarCity has become a sort of proxy for the future of solar in this country. This tremendously successful company is coming up on a one year anniversary of its IPO in December. Several developments at SolarCity warrant a closer look into this dynamic company trying to stay ahead of the curve in a growing, competitive […]

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Toyota to Unveil New FCV in November 2013

Toyota has announced that it intends to unveil its newest near-production hydrogen fuel cell vehicle at the Tokyo Motor Show in late November 2013. Right now, however, the look of the car is shaded with secrecy as it is covered with swirly foil (see picture above). Those closest to Toyota have had to undergo the […]

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Fracking’s yin and yang

By now you probably know my take on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, if you have been reading this blog and my occasional articles on TriplePundit. Briefly put, I don’t see that the advantages of a marginally cleaner carbon-based energy supply outweigh the litany of disastrous impacts—both potential and real—to the environment, the atmosphere, the earth, […]

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Women in Engineering: Personal Reflections

An article in the New York Times on October 3 on why there are still so few women in science and engineering took me by surprise.  In the first place, I’d just returned from a visit to an alumni leadership conference at my alma mater, MIT, where they were parading all the good news stories […]

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Fukushima and our inability to gauge risk

Perhaps the most important energy story on the planet right now is the precarious situation for fuel rods stored in a damaged building at the Fukushima nuclear power station in Japan, site of the worst nuclear power plant disaster in history. It’s a story that has actually been important for a while because an earthquake–in […]

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Financing Nuclear Construction Costs:

Thinking Outside the Box In the United Kingdom, Sir John Armitt, the former chairman of the Olympic Delivery Authority recently told the government that he could break the log-jam over the construction of new nuclear power plants by setting up a similar body to construct them. The particular issue he was addressing is the impasse […]

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Linde H2 Fueling Stations Hit 500,000 Fill Mark

The naysayers of hydrogen fuel complain that there is no infrastructure, H2 is unsafe, and producing hydrogen is uncommon, etc. Well, one large industrial gas company, Linde, begs to differ. Linde has just hit the 500,000 hydrogen fueling station fill mark, all safe. Their stations have provided quick and safe refills for hydrogen cars, buses […]

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